Educators

This article was written by Dr. Shelley Brooks in collaboration with Candice Dickens-Russell, Jose Flores, Nate Ivy, and Mary Walls. “Social studies is essential to understanding and addressing our environmental challenges. We usually think of science as the lens for learning about the environment, but without geography, economics, civics, psychology, anthropology, history, and sociology, we […]

[This is part 2 of a two-part post] In October 2017, Plumas Unified School District (USD) invited the entire Plumas County community to the historic Quincy schoolhouse in celebration of 30 consecutive years of outdoor education for K–12 students. How did a two-day, one-night overnight camp for a handful of 6th grade students (at what was […]

[This is part 1 of a two-part post] It’s a dark November night as I drive through the western Sierras toward Quincy, CA (elevation 3,423 ft.). The narrow road twists through pine and rock as the elevation rises, edged by water spanned by erector-set bridges and intermittent power stations. Because it is so dark, because […]

Why I Teach About Birds

Posted by Darrell Steely on January 22, 2018

“No one will protect what they don’t care about; and no one will care about what they have never experienced” ― David Attenborough “Can you see the small gray bird on the third post in the field?” asks Audubon volunteer Paul Fenwick, as students fumble with their binoculars to spot the little gray bird. As […]

How can educators better understand and teach environmental literacy in our schools? With support from California’s Environmental Literacy Steering Committee and the California Subject Matter Projects, the California International Studies Project (CISP) created a new professional learning program to address this challenge. Working with teachers in Sonoma and Long Beach this summer, CISP launched a […]

“A free-flowing river—the last of its kind—winds through 80 miles of rich habitat. Down the western side of the Sierra Nevada and across the Central Valley, the Cosumnes River flows through farmland, pastures, rare oak woodlands, and wetlands that support migrating birds. Because no dams block its flow, salmon still spawn in its waters.” ~ […]