Annual Reports

Our work to ensure that all California K–12 students have the opportunity to become environmentally literate is made possible by generous support from our funders.

We greatly appreciate our donors and funders without whom our work would not be possible. Ten Strands carefully stewards donor gifts and grants from our funders to make our highly-leveraged, collaborative work possible. We invite you to view our most recent annual report to learn more about our work and see the impact Ten Strands is having across the state.

2018

Past Annual Reports

2017

2016

2015

Keystone Species Giving Levels

MYCELIUM $1,000,000+

Mycelia, a component of fungus, are vital in the decomposition of plant material. They expand the capacity of trees to absorb water and nutrients.

HONEYBEE $500,000

Honeybees are responsible for assisting plant reproduction via pollination and help maintain and increase the genetic diversity of their ecosystem.

CORAL $250,000

Corals produce the reef structures on and in which countless other organisms live.

HUMMINGBIRD $100,000

Hummingbirds influence the persistence of several plant species through pollination.

SEA STAR $50,000

Sea stars eat mussels and other shellfish, preventing these creatures from consuming the habitat’s kelp and taking over the ecosystem.

SEA OTTER $25,000

Sea otters regulate sea urchin populations, allowing enough kelp forests to remain as a habitat for a variety of other species.

CACTUS $10,000

Cacti provide shelter and shade to many small animals, who are then consumed by larger desert animals.

GREY WOLF $5,000

Grey wolves regulate deer populations, allowing trees to thrive and remain as a habitat for several other species.

SUGAR MAPLE $1,000

Sugar maples are the habitat of many insects, birds, and animals. Their foliage provides shade to keep the ground cool and moist so earthworms and other insects can thrive and enrich the soil.

BEAR $1+

Bears control moose and elk populations. They carry and deposit seeds throughout the ecosystem and leave behind salmon remains providing the soil with critical nutrients.